Stoirm a’ Cúcóg

This unusual hornpipe comes from the Ballyshannon area. Long after the language had died out in the area the tune was always referred to by its Irish title. Its name, the Cuckoo’s Storm, refers to an old local belief that the first winds of April brought the cuckoo to Ireland. Scairbhín translates as ‘the rough month of the cuckoo’ from the phrase ‘garbh mi na gcuach’, and refers to the last two weeks of April and the first two weeks of May. Read more in Stracomer Press’ upcoming Songs Of Erne: Volume One.

Listen to Stoirm a’ Cúcóg on Soundcloud.
Stoirm a’ Cúcóg brass arrangement by Donal McGuinness.

The Hawk Of Ballyshannon

Given the antiquity of ‘Ireland’s oldest inhabited town’, it is not surprising that Ballyshannon has a musical tradition that stretches back for hundreds of years. The blind harpist and composer Rory Dall Ó Catháin wrote ‘The Hawk of Ballyshannon’ around 1640. Other sources date the composition as earlier. It is thought the tune was written as a tribute to the Fermanagh chieftain Philip McGuire. Ó Catháin is best-known for his composition of Tabhair dom do Lámh. The following story of the tune’s origin comes from Arthur O’Neill’s memoirs… (read more in Stracomer Press’ Songs Of Erne: Volume 1)

 

Listen to The Hawk Of Ballyshannon on Soundcloud.
The Hawk of Ballyshannon traditional arranged by Steve Cooney.

Listen to The Hawk Of Ballyshannon on Soundcloud.
The Hawk of Ballyshannon traditional arranged by Steve Cooney.

Tickets Available Now for “Songs of Erne”: A Special Musical Event St Anne’s Church

Songs Of Erne Book Launch Poster

“Songs of Erne”: A Special Musical Event St Anne’s Church 8pm-9:30 pm 10th November 2017 €10

Tickets are now available for next Fridays concert in St Annes Church, Ballyshannon for €10.
Enter the amount of tickets you like and click “Continue”. You can order using PayPal or your debit/credit card.

We hope to see you there for what will be a memorable evening.

 

Songs Of Erne Book Launch Poster